Archive for the ‘General’ Category

Never in E history: One day only, free shipping worldwide

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Worldwide

The following is an opinion by Joe Hadsall, and does not reflect the views of Ellusionist or its artists.

Free shipping worldwide? I’ve never seen anything like this.

Perhaps you’ve heard about our Free Worldwide Shipping Event? All it takes is an order of $75 that includes a shippable item. That, last I checked, is a phenomenally ridiculously good deal. Geriant Clarke has more:

I have been with Ellusionist since 2008. For six years, I’ve seen some pretty interesting stunts, promotions, events and programs. I’ve helped organize fundraising benefit auctions, done interviews with some unforgettable magicians, seen incredible, jaw-dropping magic and written everything from sales copy to contest rules.

But I have never seen free worldwide shipping. Never.  (more…)

Why John Scarne, expert card worker, removed sleight of hand for 150 routines

Monday, April 6th, 2015

John Scarne is legend for his skill with a deck of cards.

In his heyday, he was called the greatest card manipulator of all time, and renowned as “The World’s Foremost Gambling Authority.” His hands appeared in place of Paul Newman’s in 1973’s “The Sting,” for which he was also a technical advisor. He consulted with U.S. Army bases around the world, warning soldiers about sleight of hand scams and dice cheats. His routine Scarne’s Aces remains an inspirational mystery to card workers. The plot is nothing short of a holy grail: Cut to the aces in a borrowed, shuffled deck; no prep, no setup, no stooge, only skill. Some say Scarne took his secret to the grave as others such as Bill Malone worked out their own methods.

So why did he write a book with nothing but self-working card tricks?

Our last post about the math behind shuffling got us thinking about the math tricks, the self-workers, where a magician just has to run through a set of instructions. No sleight of hand is used, just logic, misdirection and presentation. In 1950 Scarne published “Scarne on Card Tricks,” a compendium of self-workers adapted from presentations by Harlan Tarbell, Dai Vernon, Blackstone, Cardini and more. There’s more than 150 self-working tricks in this book, and none of them use any form of advanced sleight of hand.

Why would Scarne be interested in any of that? And why would anyone who was inspired by Scarne’s skill give any amount of serious thought to that philosophy?

Simple: Scarne was a magician.

“Five years ago, I decided that the card trick enthusiasts deserved a better grade of card tricks than they had been accustomed to performing. On the whole, the tricks performed by the non-sleight of hand card enthusiasts at that time were so simple that the secret was easily discovered by the person or persons they were intended to mystify.”

As mentioned above, he put out the call to other magicians for routines, but the routines he got still used some sleight of hand. So Scarne reworked them to replace it. Replacing moves with new formulas, dodges, subtleties, ruses, psychology, misdirection and feints, he re-created those submissions into routines that still produced the intended effect.

In case that last paragraph didn’t floor you, here’s the recap: A master manipulator reworked more than 150 tricks to be performed without sleight of hand.

The book is filled with advanced deception techniques and subterfuge. There’s no passes, but there are some deadly peeks. There are no sideslips, but there is a great use of salt. And it’s filled with Scarne’s thoughts, wisdom and plans for misdirection. Incredible stuff here.

We don’t hear much scorn or disdain from our customers anymore about self-workers, and that makes us smile. It takes a different kind of skill to successfully perform a self-worker, after all.

Do you have it?

Power in your pocket: Get the most magic out of your smartphone

Friday, March 27th, 2015

 

One of our favorite things to see on Instagram are pictures you share with us of what’s in your pockets. A lot of you are fantastic Instagrammers, and you take intricately arranged, beautifully composed shots of objects important enough for you to carry daily.

We always see playing cards in them — your favorite deck is important to you, obviously. We also see card clips, wallets, keys, pencils, knives, bottle openers and magic props. Each one of those things has an obvious magical purpose. But there’s one object we see appearing in your shots that we bet you’re not using to its full potential for your magic: Your cellphone.

These aren’t vintage bricks or monotone flip phones we’re seeing — far from it. They are the latest flagship devices. Y’all love your iPhone 6, Samsung Galaxy S5 or whatever device you chose. You considered it carefully and picked it proudly, because you knew it would be right there in your pocket to meet the specific needs you have.

But are you using your phone to its fullest magic potential? We’re gambling that you aren’t.

Magic apps such as the incredible City Prediction go a long way, of course. But we’re also talking about so much more. That smartphone is a personal computer, capable of holding a tremendous amount of data and apps that can help you pursue the art of magic. Here’s a few ideas:  (more…)

David Copperfield reminds us about magic’s power to bond people

Friday, March 6th, 2015

There’s a lot of reasons we’re proud to be magicians. The art has enhanced our lives in so many different ways, from the way we can size up situations instantly, to the way we share joy and beauty with all sorts of people.

David Copperfield reminded us of another reason we’re proud.

The legendary illusionist, who has inspired so many modern magicians, wrote a column for the New York Times about the power of magical thinking. It’s a testament to how magic profoundly affects the human psyche.

“My fellow artists and I are here to create, if only for an hour or two, a concord among every member of the audience. Art has the ability to unite people into a collective mind. That’s the real magic, what those in the hate business can’t countenance.”

In making his point, he takes a trip through history, and how people have tried to suppress art, from how King James I in 1584 tried to destroy all copies of a book about sleight of hand to how a street magician was beheaded by terrorists in Syria. He also ties in other pop culture and efforts to suppress it, from the hacking of Sony Pictures to the attack on Charlie Hebdo.

And for those who think Copperfield has never had to deal with any of those issues, they would be wrong. He tells a story about a trip to mid-1990s Moscow, where the Russion Orthodox Church claims his upcoming performance there is anti-religion.

Of course he won them over.

“Boris N. Yeltsin invites me to the Kremlin. When I arrive, who’s there but the patriarch, the head of the Russian Orthodox Church. Through interpreters we talk, we hang, titles and official roles fading as the night (and the vodka) wears on. At the end of night, the patriarch smiles and gives me the thumbs up. We’d started as strangers, suspicious of each other, and ended as pals. He realized I’m not Satan’s emissary, just a hard-working guy from New Jersey, as controversial (and, I hope, as entertaining) as a Cole Porter melody.”

His column is definitely worth the read, because it reminds us that we magicians are on the frontlines of a war against division. All that practice, all those performances; every business card we pass, every card we have signed, torn and restored — it all works toward bonding people together, and sharing a beautiful experience.

“Those of us in the entertainment business have a duty to vanish the idea that there’s an “us” and a “them.” When audiences unite in joy and wonder, you realize that the key isn’t the suspension of disbelief, but the suspension of divisive beliefs.”

Thanks for that reminder, David. Bravo.

Network debut: Adam Wilber, Justin Miller featured in Syfy’s ‘Wizard Wars’

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

Tonight is the night. Two of magic’s boldest performers will appear on one of their biggest stages yet: A prime-time cable network show.

Ellusionist General Manager Adam Wilber and longtime performer Justin Miller team up and compete for $10,000 on the Syfy show “Wizard Wars.” Developed by Rick Lax and Justin Flom, the show gives a “Chopped”-style spin to magic shows: Pairs of magicians must develop magic effects and routines based on mystery objects given to them before the show.

How do Adam and Justin fare? Do they advance past the preliminary round and take on the show’s pros? We have high hopes. But no matter how they finish, Adam said the experience was a blast.

“We were pretty comfortable about the challenge because we set out to make our performance as entertaining and fun as we could with what we were given,” Adam said. “I’m happy with the way it turned out and, most importantly, we had a blast putting it together.”

Both Justin and Adam have reputations for performing fearlessly in a variety of situations. A performer with Ellusionist since the company’s early days, Justin recently completed filming The BOLD Project, which featured one of the craziest, riskiest performances we’ve ever captured on video — and he KILLED. Before Adam’s promotion to general manager, he had cemented his reputation as a worker by performing for anyone, anytime. He is the creator of The Working Man and the author of Creative Magic.

Adam said they were approached by Syfy to appear on the show. After a Skype interview, he was on a plane to Los Angeles for filming, he said.

But those are in close-up, street situations. How did the two interact on a stage, working as a team? Pretty well, Adam said.

“Justin and I are very close friends, so working with him was like second nature,” Adam said. “Two minds make the workload easier, for sure. Justin and I have a similar style of magic, so there was not a lot of teaking that had to be done. It all felt pretty natural.”

The performance went… well, you’ll see. Audience members reacted well, and connected with the two afterward to say how much they enjoyed it. Reaction elsewhere has also been overwhelming, he said. And some of the best performance feedback came from two of the show’s celebrity judges, Penn and Teller.

“It’s always great to get criticism from artists you respect,” Adam said.

“Wizard Wars” airs at 10 p.m. EST Thursdays on Syfy.